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, requires us all i think he rethink how we stand in the middle east. so tonight i'd like to talk about the three threats to the united states that emanate from the persian gulf. iran, saudi arabia, and what i call al qaeda -ism. in speaking tonight about the persian gulf, and the war against the islamist militancy emanating from there, i want to start with words george washington used to describe the new national governments responsibilities to ensure that americans clearly understand the threats they face at home and abroad. i am sure that the massive citizens of these united states meanwhile, washington told john j. in 1796. and i believe that they will always act will whenever they can update a right understanding of matters. let me say that i share washington's fate and he essentially sound common sense of american. except perhaps that of the coming generation whose male members seemed unable to figure out how to put a baseball cap on so the brim points forward. but i'm not saying saying that when a national government under either party is capable or even desirous of the actually
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
used helicopters to try to drop cooling water from above. but the winds and radiation levels forced it to be abandoned. he appeared on television to try to reassure his people. people are not reassured. we found families dashing to board trains south. what are you most worried about? >> i am most worried about the nuclear plants because i have small children. i want to stay far away from tokyo. >> many people live and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan. families are leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. leaving is not an option for many. there are not enough places to go. if there is a major leak of radiation there does not seem to be a plan either. the family has not been told about it. they are watching developments further north with consternation. they have a baby and don't trust what the government is telling them. >> the government says we are safe but i don't think so. i don't trust them. >> one that? >> because [unintelligible] >> what is this? this is new? >> instead they are making their own plans. a car standing by to head sout
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
for the past two days with the u.s. military. trying to get a grasp of a progress report on the ground here. the successes, the frustrations, the planning for the way ahead. the uncertainty that lies along the way in this village, we are 30-miles from the afghan-pakistan border. still, ten years after the start of the war and it's still a hot bed along the border of taliban activity. this place has seen dramatic security change. development has come. not the case across the board in afghanistan but there have been successes in a moment, we'll show you that. you will hear the interview with general david petraeus before he heads back to washington to give a progress report to congress. jennifer griffin is traveling with robert gates as he travels here in afghanistan as well. all of that in a moment. but first, check in with shannon bream in the washington bureau for the top headlines of the day. >> thank you, bret. >> shannon: president obama ended a two-year ban on guantanamo bay and it will come two days ahead of congressional hearing about the danger of american radicalized by the terrori
suggested? using the constitution? or use the money to repay money we've already borrowed? adding debt will help enslave future generations of to us the lenders. from new york, defending freedom, good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >>> welcome to afghanistan for a special edition of "special report." i'm bret baier. we have been traveling for the past two days with the u.s. military. trying to get a grasp of a progress report on the ground here. the successes, the frustrations, the planning for the way ahead. the uncertainty that lies along the way in this village, we are 30-miles from the afghan-pakistan border. still, ten years after the start of the war and it's still a hot bed along the border of taliban activity. this place has seen dramatic security change. development has come. not the case across the board in afghanistan but there have been successes in a moment, we'll show you that. you will hear the interview with general david petraeus before he heads back to washington to give a progress report to congress. jennifer griffin is traveling wi
we have the technology that permits us to detect the very large majority -- i estimate 90% -- of the people trying to cross illegally into the united states in that sector. what that means, mr. chairman, is that when we say 58,000 as opposed to 560,000 people arrested last year and six -- in san diego, i can tell you that my friends and neighbors in san diego will tell you that this order is not out of control. san diego is one of the safest 10 cities in the united states and there are three other border cities among the safest in the united states. . in respect to the capacities that you are developing and secondly some of the budget implications of those efforts. prior to the attempted air cargo bombing plot out of yemen last fall, cbp was receiving international air cargo manifests four hours before cargo arrival in the united states. that is after the plane was air borne. in response to the october 29, 2010 mailing, the national targeting center has been working with air carriers so they can analyze cargo manifests before flights take off. in december, cbp began piloti
people there. or let us help our breers in benghazi. one day, you'll wake up and find you are supporting the wrong people. it's like the wmd in iraq. it's another story. >> thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> that's the view from the gadhafis in libya. let's go to alexander marquardt. what is the mood there? >> reporter: we're in tubruq. an opposition spokes sman said here the mood is sky high. they feel that the rebels will be able to push the gadhafi forces out of other cities. they want to get to tripoli and oust gadhafi. we spoke to people on the streets there. they're thankful to countries likes the u.s. and france. they believe this will eventually lead to a free libya. there's a period of insurgency. this is the scary part because of how illogical gadhafi is and because of what he called his thirst for blood. >> alex, thanks. let's go to the capital of tripoli again. allen little, of the bbc is there. he joins us live. you heard the mood in benghazi. what do you think the next move is in tripoli? how are they portraying it there? >> reporter: well, finding colonel gadhafi.
to talk about what this means for pakistan's tiny community and the issue of religious freedom. joining us by skype is international correspondent gary lane and paul marshal of the hudson institute's center for religious freedom and sharad from proximate cause pakistan, an attorney. great to have you all on the broadcast. first we begin with jennifer wishon who tell general ulysses s. grant more about shahbaz bhatti and his mission. >> reporter: shahbaz bhatti had just left his mother's home when radical islamists opened fire, riddling it with bullets. security team not with him. the 42 year old had been leading the abolishment of blasphemy laws. he received threats from al-qaeda and taliban but continued his work. >> i want to share i believe in jesus christ who has given his own life for us. i know what is the meaning of cross. and i am following of the cross. b and i am ready to die for a cause, living for my community and suffering people. i will die to defend their rights. so these people cannot change my opinion and principles. >> members of the pakistan taliban said they killed bhat
away from the stricken plant. they are then tested for radiation exposure. japan is using a helicopter to dump water on the reactors and u.s. scientists are joining the effort to help prevent a full meltdown. >> we are first and foremost focused now on helping in any way we can to help the japanese government and the power company contain -- cool down the reactors and contain it and stop the leaking. >> reporter: u.s. helicopters are still flying in relief suppliesment on the ground search continues for survivors as the death toll markets. and the stock market rebounded after two dismal days. u.s. markets may follow the trend today but with both the nuclear crisis and a humanitarian disaster, jap an will face years of recovery. japan's defense ministry said the water drops seen on tv were a drill and there are no plans to dump water on the to the nuclear reactors. damages are now estimated between $150 up to nearly $200 billion and that's without the possible nuclear meltdown. allison and tony. >> sherry ly, thank you so much. >>> the priority is keeping the fuel rods cool. friday's ea
radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower radiation over a broad area. it must be said the japanese authorities are denying the report. but just one of several challenges that the authorities have been dealing with, in the last 24 hours. the problems with the stricken fukushima nuclear complex in northeastern japan change by the hour. on wednesday, a new fire ignited at one reactor and radioactive steam burst from another. it prompted remaining workers to be yanked and more residents to flee the area. >> if the fuel rods are exposed the radiation material inside the container could seep out. >> it's also causing the people of t
was at the speech. he's joining us now live. nic, was this another simple ramble expose, if you will, by gadhafi, a little bit more normal than what he said yesterday, or was it just vintage gadhafi? >> reporter: i think this was gadhafi going on the offensive, far from throwing in the towel and giving up here. a two and a half hour speech, longer than some of his other speeches. the symbolism was there, carried live on national tv. walked into the room and crowds of his supporters chanted and he literally stood taking all this adulation for ten minutes before he sat down and started speaking. he had a number of threats, not only for the united states, as we heard there, but for the rebels. on the one hand telling the rebels just there's gunfire going on in the background in tripoli, not only telling the rebels that they should put down their weapons and they wouldn't face charges or they could still sort of stop the fighting, if they wanted to, which was strange because at the same time he was attacking them, bombing them in the east of the country, as ben wedeman was witnessing, but also he wa
education, research. and now toave the republican leader come and tell us we've got to accept that, that's the future of america. no, it's not. time and again when we sit down to deal with the budget challenges, whether it's in the deficit commission, which i was honest servicessered to serve on -- which i was honored to serve on, or whether it's in past negotiations, we open this table up to all federal spending, not just to 14%, that tiny slice of a pie. senator mcconnell c remembe remember, and i can too, under president herbert walker bush and under president clinton, we put on the table these tax breaks for some of these oil companies and corporations and said, is it really worth america's future for us to give them a tax break or to use the money to reduce the deficit? that's an honest question. mandatory spending. all of these things need to be brought to the table for conversation. but that's not the position of the republicans. they would rather see us shut down the government than to open this conversation to the entire federal budget. they would rather see us shut down t
off. so we continue to have a very desperate situation there and those u.s. officials coming in to try to help to see what they can do. meantime, the humanitarian crisis is widening. it is another very cold night here in japan. the snows were very heavy around the most seriously affected areas. so you have all the people without heat, without electricity. food and water supplies remain very low as do gas supplies. it is tough for people to get around, although they did have some buses of people, evacuees they were able to take out of the immediate area. and they're continuing to test people, including babies for radiation contamination. but red cross workers, other international aid organizations, they're being very cautious right now. they have actually pulled back a little farther away from the nuclear plant. obviously they want to protect the health and safety of their workers as they try to deal with this humanitarian crisis. thomas? >> chris jansing in tokyo for us. chris, thanks so much. >>> the radiation released from nuclear power plants raises concerns about whether wind condi
is in recess. we are going to focus on the story from libya. and your calls and reaction as u.s. and allies strike those targets. 202-737-0002, our line for democrats. 202-737-0001 for republicans. for independence, the number to call is 202-628-0205. here are some of the headlines from domestic newspapers beginning with "new york post." "take that gaddafi." "strike one." an air assault, no ground troops, but tomahawk missiles continue to strike those targets. some other headlines beginning with the chicago tribune. u.s. allies are attacking libya. most of it right along the coast. you can see along the mediterranean sea. l.a. times -- attacks on libya. you can see from the u.s. and navy destroyers. operation "odyssey dawn" was the name of the operation. from the "richmond times- dispatch", the u.s. striking libyan forces. and from the "miami herald", libya under fire. you can join the conversation online at twitter.com/cspanwj. caller: good morning. i would like to know what the heck is going on. here we are and another freakin' war. congress is on vacation. who is minding the store? i'm a
>> glenn: from new york, good night america. >>> president obama warns muammar khadafy that the u.s. is ready to join an allied effort to protect civilians. a judge in wisconsin blocks the new collective bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was act
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
chertoff. it is an honor for us to have you with us today. we are grateful to be joined today by members of congress. i wish to thank the aspen institute for bringing us together today, and in particular to walter isaacson. it is an honor to be able to welcome the members of the aspen institute community here to a georgetown barracks -- to georgetown. i would also like to thank students at the georgetown university lecture fund for helping the staff this event. i wish to welcome andrea mitchell, the lottery -- the moderator of today house conversation. this gives us an opportunity to reflect on the changes of our world since 2001, and the ways in which the united states government has responded. later this year we will observe the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the world trade center and the pentagon. in response to these attacks, congress created the department of homeland security to be led by the secretary, a member of the president's cabinet. the creation of the department united 22 agencies across they say the branch, making it a lot but -- the largest reorganization o
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wonderi
, in reclaiming control of bin jawad, an eastern coastal city. and today saw regime using tanks, rockets and war planes to attack a nearby rebel stronghold in the oil exporting town. five reported airstrikes failed to budge the rebel whose abbott weapons did with pickup trucks. >> i talked to the gunners, none of them have been train and none of them know what they are doing. they said to me a number of times, you are an american, why has america not stepped in and given up the no-fly zone to make this a fair fight? >> reporter: about that prospect, u.s. officials remain noncommittal. spokesman for secretary of state clinton said allied nation are reviewing the idea of a no fly zone with urgency, but offered this answer when asked how many weeks of air attacks it will take before a decision is reached. >> there is no particular timetable. >> reporter: at the u.n. security council, fox news learned that british and french diplomats have begun drafting a resolution to create no fly zone. that sources said could be ready at the drop of a hat. >> it has to have a clear basis, demonstrative need, bro
at that reactor are overheating. authorities are now working on a plan to use a water cannon to cool down a pool which is storing spent fuel rods at the number 4 reactor who was on fire earlier today. jenna: we are taking a look at the helicopters that were going to lower water on some of the nuke plants. there are still after shocks happening. have there been any more earthquakes today in japan. reporter: the last earthquake which shook tokyo happened about one and a half hours ago. that was just northeast of tokyo. and today there have been at least seven quakes with a magnitude of 5 and over. they actually seem to be heading in a southwest direction towards tokyo, and last night there was one which was literally underneath mount fugi which is tkoer tphapbt and overlooks tokyo, and that did spook some people, but there is no indication that it could lead anything to be some kind of eruption. jenna: david ross is taking in the destruction and terrible weather that hit the coastline in japan. maybe a personal question for you. how are you dealing with the situation and operating there in japan a
at us than i can shoot back. of so we did and they just waved. [laughter] now over 1300 miles notice the road, they drove every night and i noted the ammunition. the other problem with afghanistan is called pakistan 1500 miles that extends here to miami. now understand the essence of what we are doing. we went in 2001 because the taliban supported al qaeda who had killed 3,000 americans at the world trade center's we went in to get the seven guns but what happened? in my judgment several things happened. president bush, a god bless him, had a religious belief in liberty four people and i think he confuse that with his role of president and took that and extracted it to say we should give liberty to the iraqis and afghans which is a noble idea but if you are a president sometimes you have to be hard-headed how you apply an idea into action and we were not able to do with sell when they said who will do this idea? they said if we have the united states military. so we took counterinsurgency a subject i know all lot about because i thought to it really hard for many months. but we perve
week." u.s. and allied bombs and missiles hammer libyan targets. the rebels gain ground. and the president prepares to make his pitch to the american people. >> it's u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> what if gadhafi stays? just back from the middle east, robert gates and hillary clinton come to "this week" for their first interviews since the attacks began to make the president's case. what does victory look like? kit be achieved? at what cost? >>> then -- >> i don't have any regrets at all. >> what would donald rumsfeld do in a third war. and he'll respond to critics who say he's been rewriting history. >>> and george will and the "roundtable" will talk to us. why is one hopeful having a tough time agreeing with himself. >> announcer: live from the newseum. >>> some major developments in libya. rebel forces have scored a key victory taking back the oil town of brega in theest. they continue the push west. abc's alex marquardt is in benghazi. what is the mood there? >> reporter: a lot of gun fire and horn honking. a quick advance toward the west was expected follo
increase the budget and put us on all the ideas. if we for example -- there are so many assumptions, and very different figures but if we saw an economic growth that we want, if we saw as afghanistan, having 52% with defense spending be pretty you would see us get to that level. .. >> what would be the consequences of failing to increase the defense budget by in real terms some noticeable amount from 2015? >> if we wanted the rate of real terms increase will determine how quickly we can get to the benchmarks that we have set out for 2020. if it is a steep increase, we will reach that point earlier. >> what do you mean by steep? let's say 3% real terms increase pay year? >> well, that would be very nice. [laughter] >> and, of course, that -- it also depends on the decisions that we take in the early years as to where we are on the carbon as to the upswing of that. they are all dependent on, if, for example, we were to take steeper savings in the early year, it requires a sharper upswing in the late years to get to the same point. the rate -- the actual number of the real terms growth
is the justification for continued u.s. taxpayer investment? in egypt and elsewhere, successive u.s. administrations failed to move beyond the status quo and prepare for the future. we should not associate the protests in jordan and bahrain events transpire in other places. we have failed to effectively use our resources to help build strong accountable institutions that protect basic human rights. this administration's crier decision to cut support from pro-democracy civil groups in egypt and the only fund groups seceded with the mubarak government is a mistake and it must never repeat. then the mistake of the bush administration and continued and that the country -- under the current administration, to get new business with the libyan regime. john's wife, victoria, my constituent, and others are in the audience today. madam secretary, i have a letter that they have written requesting yours and director miller's help in securing information about the role of gaddafi in the 1980's and 1990. some of us objected to the normalization of relations with the libyan regime. this is proof that the oppressor
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
in u.s. history with former assistant secretary of defense and vietnam veteran bing west. in his book, he offers a speeding critique and says the u.s. military should not be in the business of nation-building. his new book is called "the wrong war." our conversation with bing west coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: as i mentioned at the top, the war in afghanistan is in its 10th year, making it the longest in u.s. history. among those who question u.s. currency and policy for years now is bing west. his new book on the subject is called "the wrong war." i
details to emerge. we have not seen the word defection use by the foreign office but there is no doubt that this is a senior figure turning his back on it gaddafi. >> the bbc's world affairs editor is in tripoli. he says that colonel gaddafi is going to be too concerned by the resignation. >> this will have an impact but we have to remember that gaddafi has lost plenty of ministers before. his interior minister is now a senior figure in benghazi. there have been others as well. my guess is that they will stop this off. whether moussa koussa will be such a gain to the rebels and their representatives in london is uncertain. we must remember that some people have been in accusing him of involvement with the lockerbie bombing, for instance. he was the head of intelligence for colonel gaddafi. that is not a neutral post. nevertheless, it means that they're going to be people are around colonel gaddafi that will be thinking now about their future is very carefully. but at the same time, this is really a one horse government. it is all about colonel gaddafi and those people who are loyal to
to the airport there. he is going to join us for the very latest. again two u.s. service members among those who were killed and injured in an attack there at the airport in germany. we will bring that to you in just a short time. also we want to bring you up to date on fast moving developments. the libyan military has dropped three bombs and you see it on the map, brega. the opposition may control the town managing to drive out libyan troops. that's not the only place to see military action there. military camps on the outskirts. first we want to tell you about an aerial bombing has led some to propose the united states consider imposing a no-fly zone over the country. but the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff said he called this a complex operation. one of those is a uss -- you are looking here at a photo of the ship from today as it went through the canal. near the region. secretary of defense, robert gates has said the repositioning is to provide humanitarian relief and the capen't for emergency evaguations. let me tell you about the capabilities. it has the ability to transport troops,
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
you for that. >>> thanks to you at home for staying with us this hour. here is what happened at three mile island. one of the reactors at three mile old about half melted down because of human error and technical failures and some bad design. the cooling system at three mile island failed and the water levels inside that reactor fell. that meant that the super hot and radioactive fuel rods inside the reactor were no longer being cooled by water covering them up. and so they started to melt. fuel rods are long, skinny metal tubes with pellets of uranium in them. they are hot. they are also radio actively hot, too. once those things at three mile island were not being cooled by water, once they heated to a couple thousand degrees fahrenheit, the metal tubes holding the pellets started to breakdown. when the temperature got even hotter, the uranium fuel itself started to meltdown. melting fuel rods like that can release a ton of radioactivity. they are radioactive, that is on purpose. that's how they make nuclear power. when they breakdown, they release it into the atmosphere. they also
coastal town of -- a key coastal town. the libyan forces used tanks and artillery. our world affairs editors sent this report. >> at dawn this morning, it was a media elite clear that the rebels enthusiasm and fighting spirit was fading. it has carried them 150 miles westward along the coast, beating colonel gaddafi's troops back. but other supply lines are stretched and gaddafi's troops are fighting a more friendly territory. we went with the rebels to the next town, which they attacked fiercely. but the offender's head -- the defenders had better weapons. when we went there, we found the rebels had faded away during the night. from a distance collies i checkpoint which we eventually decided was probably manned by gaddafi loyalists. it was. a couple of soldiers opened fire in our direction. >> keep your head down. >> we drove back hastily down the road to the important oil town captured by the rebels on friday night. today, far fewer of them were making a stand here. the rebels are being forced all the way back to ras lanuf. it has been quite a success for colonel gaddafi's army. th
and soldiers rebel fighters. we have reports of increased fighting today. in misrata to the west of us and also to the south of us and here again in benghazi fear that his army might be headed next. we have reports from misurata there was a barrage of tank fire on that city center and homes in the suburbs said to the worst bombardment in that town yet with 25 reportedly killed, tough to get independent reports because journalists have not been allowed in the city. we're hearing from rebel commander who has been into a town 90 miles south of us, khadafy pounded the city with tanks and anti-tank missiles hitting rebel positions. he says as many as 30 people may have been killed there today. power is out. cells are down and resupply routes cut off. spiritually the opposition will fight to the last bullet but realistically they don't know how long they can continue. there were celebrations here and many other cities across libya. overnight with news of that no-fly zone approved by the united nations. there was celebratory gunfire, horns honked and victory signs flashed but there are concerns that s
. sitting in tonight, chris haze. good evening. >> good evening. thank you for staying with us the next hour. rachel has the night off. >>> the nuclear crisis in japan is still volatile tonight. there have been numerous developments today. we'll get to those shortly. we begin with something you should never have to ask, something that should never be a question. are we at war? yes, we are at war in iraq and afghanistan, and maybe sort of in pakistan as well. but are we at war again in another middle eastern country? it is not a provocative rhetorical question, it is one so-called no fly zone over libya and to take all necessary measures to protect civilians under attack. faced with threat from moammar gadhafi of a massacre of his own civilians, united nations approved military action against libya, which is a big fricking deal. for us, for the united nations, for the region. yet what made last night so eery and strange was that this big, historical moment, this commitment by a number of nations to use force, fell into the american political conversation like a pebble into a well. we just com
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